2004 - Press Release Archives

Electric Boat delivers submarine Jimmy Carter to U.S. Navy
(Dec. 22, 2004)

Navy awards EB $11.3M for submarine maintenance work
(Dec. 17, 2004)

Employees, EB pledge a record $1.52M to regional charities
(Dec. 9, 2004)

EB awarded $5.6M contract mod for submarine work
(Dec. 7, 2004)

Submarine Jimmy Carter completes first voyage
(Nov. 19, 2004)

EB awarded $47.7M contract mod for submarine work
(Nov. 15, 2004)

Casey introduces new structure for top management
(Nov. 8, 2004)

EB awarded $15.5M contract for submarine engineering work
(Oct. 14, 2004)

EB delivers lead Virginia-class submarine to U.S. Navy
(Oct. 13, 2004)

EB hosts keel-laying for Hawaii (SSN776)
(Aug. 27, 2004)

EB awarded $27M contract modification for submarine work
(Aug. 26, 2004)

Navy awards EB $16.4M for submarine maintenance work
(Aug. 17, 2004)

Virginia (SSN774) completes first voyage
(July 30, 2004)

EB christens submarine Jimmy Carter (SSN23)
(June 5, 2004)

EB awarded $12.8M contract modification for submarine work
(June 2, 2004)

Jimmy Carter, third and final Seawolf submarine, to be christened June 5
(June 1, 2004)

Electric Boat, MTC agree to safety incentive
(May 28, 2004)

EB prepares submarine Jimmy Carter for June 5 christening
(May 10, 2004)

EB awarded $299M for submarine work and materials
(May 6, 2004

EB distributes layoff notices to 134 employees
(May 3, 2004))

Navy awards EB $7.7M contract for submarine maintenance
(April 13, 2004)

Carroll, Smith named to Finance posts
(April 6, 2004)

Navy awards EB $64M contract mod for Virginia-class work
(April 5, 2004)

Key management team members begin job reassignments
(April 2, 2004)

Navy awards EB $111M for submarine modernization work
(March 26, 2004)

Wilson named project director for UK's Astute-class program
(March 17, 2004)

EB awarded $31.6M contract for work on nuclear submarines
(March 3, 2004)

Navy awards EB $149.4M contract mod for SSGN work
(March 3, 2004)

EB receives $19M contract mod for submarine services
(Feb. 25, 2004)

EB awarded $15.6M contract modification for SSGN work
(Feb. 6, 2004)

Navy awards EB $6.2M contract option for submarine parts
(Jan. 30, 2004)

EB receives $8.4B multiyear contract for Va.-class submarines
(Jan. 29, 2004)

MTC members to receive $150 safety award
(Jan. 14, 2004)

Electric Boat delivers submarine Jimmy Carter to U.S. Navy
(Dec. 22, 2004)

Electric Boat today delivered the Jimmy Carter (SSN23), the nation's newest and most advanced submarine, to the U.S Navy. With the turnover of USS Virginia (SSN774) to the Navy Oct. 12, the event marked the company's second delivery in 72 days.

The Jimmy Carter honors the 39th president of the United States - the only submarine-qualified man who went on to become the nation's chief executive. It will join the fleet in a commissioning ceremony to be held Feb. 19 at the Naval Submarine Base in Groton.

Differentiating the Jimmy Carter from all other submarines is its Multi-Mission Platform (MMP), which includes a 100-foot, 2,500-ton hull extension that enhances payload capability, enabling the ship to accommodate advanced technology required to develop and test an entirely new generation of weapons, sensors and undersea vehicles. At the same time, the submarine retains the operational characteristics of the Seawolf class - the fastest, quietest, most heavily armed undersea combatants in the world.

Selected by the Navy to serve as a test bed for submarine missions in the 21st century, the Jimmy Carter will support classified research, development, test and evaluation efforts for naval special-warfare missions, tactical undersea surveillance, and undersea warfare concepts.

"By applying our Design/Build process to the MMP, the Electric Boat workforce made a seamless and cost-effective transition from conceptual development, to engineering and design, and production," said President John P. Casey.

"In fact, the MMP - equivalent in complexity to a complete SSN688-class submarine - has progressed from a notional state to construction and integration into the overall ship in less than five years, essentially cutting the procurement time in half. By any measure, it is a remarkable technological achievement, reflecting Electric Boat's commitment to continued submarine excellence," said Casey.

"I could not be prouder of the women and men of Electric Boat, who have put their hearts and souls into the effort to make this morning's delivery possible," he continued. "So let me congratulate everyone who had a part in the production of this extraordinarily capable ship. You can take pride in knowing that the Jimmy Carter will help ensure the security of this nation in ways no other vessel can."

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Navy awards EB $11.3M for submarine maintenance work
(Dec. 17, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat an $11.3 million contract modification to perform routine maintenance work on the USS Dallas (SSN700), a Los Angeles-class attack submarine.

Under the terms of the modification, Electric Boat will perform a Drydock Selected Restricted Availability, which consists of repairs, maintenance work and alterations. The work will take place at the Naval Submarine Base in Groton between February and April 2005. Initially awarded in August 2004, the contract has a total value of $16.4 million.

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Employees, EB pledge a record $1.52M to regional charities
(Dec. 9, 2004)

Electric Boat employees and the company have combined to pledge a record total of $1.52 million for regional health and human-services agencies.

Of the total $1.2 million raised by employees, $950,000 will be donated to the United Way of Southeastern Connecticut. In addition, Electric Boat will make a $300,000 contribution to the regional United Way. The remainder of the $1.2 million in employee donations will be allocated to other United Way and charitable organizations where EB employees live.

The leaders of this year’s Community Services drive – MTC President Ken DelaCruz, MDA-UAW President John Worobey and EB VP Bob Nardone – credited the success of the effort to the campaign volunteers from the MTC, MDA-UAW and salaried ranks. This year’s participation rate increased from 72 percent to 82 percent of the workforce. In addition, EB membership in United Way’s Spinnaker Club – givers of $1,000 or more – increased by 50 to a total of 250 employees.

“Year after year, we come together to help the people in our communities who need it most,” said EB President John Casey. “We’ve achieved that goal again this year – and in a bigger way than ever before. I’m proud to be part of an organization that cares as much as we do, and I want to thank everyone who contributed to this year’s campaign.”

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EB awarded $5.6M contract mod for submarine work
(Dec. 7, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $5.6 million contract modification for nuclear submarine work.

Under the terms of the contract modification, Electric Boat will provide design agent, planning yard, engineering and technical support for nuclear submarines. Initially awarded March 3, the contract could be worth more than $1.1 billion over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Ninety-five percent of the work will be performed at Groton; 2 percent at Newport, R.I.; 1 percent at Quonset Point, R.I.; 1 percent at Bangor, Wash.; and 1 percent at Kings Bay, Ga. Work performed under this modification is expected to be completed by September 2008.

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Submarine Jimmy Carter completes first voyage
(Nov. 19, 2004)

The Jimmy Carter (SSN23), the nation’s newest and most advanced nuclear-powered attack submarine, returned to the Electric Boat shipyard here today following the successful completion of its first voyage in open seas, called “alpha sea trials.”

The Jimmy Carter is the third and final ship of the Seawolf class – the fastest, quietest, most heavily armed submarines in the world. While the Jimmy Carter retains all of the operational capabilities of the Seawolf class, a 100-foot hull extension called the Multi-Mission Platform provides enhanced payload capabilities, enabling the submarine to accommodate the advanced technology required to develop and test a new generation of weapons, sensors and undersea vehicles.

The Jimmy Carter’s alpha sea trials included a range of submarine and propulsion plant operations, submerging for the first time, and high-speed runs on the surface and submerged to demonstrate that the ship’s propulsion plant is fully mission capable.

Participating in the sea trials were U.S. Navy Adm. Kirkland Donald, director – Naval Nuclear Propulsion; Rear Adm. Jeffrey Cassias, commander – Submarine Group Two; and Rear Adm. John Butler, program executive officer (Submarines). Also participating in the sea trials were Capt. Jeffrey Reed, the Navy’s supervisor of shipbuilding in Groton; and John Casey, president of Electric Boat.

The Jimmy Carter is commanded by Capt. Robert D. Kelso of Gales Ferry, Conn.

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EB awarded $47.7M contract mod for submarine work
(Nov. 15, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $47.7 million contract modification for nuclear submarine work.

Under the terms of the contract modification, Electric Boat will provide design agent, planning yard, engineering and technical support for nuclear submarines. Electric Boat will also provide research and development support for submarine research vehicles. Initially awarded March 3, the contract could be worth more than $1.1 billion over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Sixty-two percent of the work will be performed at Groton; 18 percent at Bangor, Wash.; 14 percent at Kings Bay, Ga.; 5 percent at Newport, R.I.; and 1 percent at Quonset Point, R.I. Work performed under this modification is expected to be completed by November 2006.

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Casey introduces new structure for top management
(Nov. 8, 2004)

EB President John Casey today announced a sweeping reorganization of his executive staff.

The changes are intended to better respond to the current and future business environment by:

  • Preserving core capabilities
  • Preserving and enhancing Navy customer relations
  • Remaining flexible and adaptable to new opportunities
  • Anticipating a shrinking business base

According to Casey, the new organization will be realigned into six areas: Programs, Resources, Engineering, Operations, Quality and Legal. Assigned to lead these groups and reporting to Casey are:

Fred Harris, senior VP – Programs. In addition to his current programmatic responsibilities, he will oversee Technology Development (VP Millard Firebaugh), Life Cycle Support & Overhaul/Repair (VP John Padgett), Strategic Planning (Director Steve Ruzzo) and Strategic Business Development (Director Kristin Fletcher).

John Leonard, senior VP – Resources. He will retain responsibility for the company’s financial operations. Additionally, he will oversee Human Resources & Administration (VP Bob Nardone), Public Affairs (Director Neil Ruenzel), Material Management (Director Blair Decker) and Manpower Planning (Manager Hank Rianhard).

Pete Halvordson, VP – Engineering. He will be responsible for Design, Engineering, Construction Engineering, Planning, Process Engineering/Process Improvement and Information Services.

Bob Scheel, VP – Quality. He will continue to direct Quality and Radiological Control activities.

Joe Chontos, VP and General Counsel. He will remain responsible for the company’s legal functions.

Rick Geschrei, VP – Operations. He will oversee Groton Operations, Nuclear and Submarine Base operations, Test, Ship Management, Facilities Management, SSGN activities at Norfolk and Puget Sound, the Kesselring site and Process/Manufacturing Engineering.

Geschrei also will be responsible for Quonset Point, where Bill Frydryk will become site manager.

Frydryk’s predecessor, John Holmander, will take on responsibility for the Virginia program, reporting to Harris.

Additionally, Casey said, Dave McCall will direct all submarine test functions and Kevin Devine will be responsible for ship management. They will report to Geschrei.

“This restructuring is the first step in a broader reorganization that will consolidate organizations by adjusting spans of control and management layers, while strengthening business performance and financial oversight,” said Casey.

“We also intend to leverage the strengths of our individual employees, which will broaden the company’s experience base. And we will sharpen our focus on program and customer interface, financial control and the performance of our Operations and Engineering functions,” he said.

Additional information on the restructuring, its underlying rationale and its impact on the company’s future will be provided in the November issue of Electric Boat News.

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EB awarded $15.5M contract for submarine engineering work
(Oct. 14, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a contract modification for engineering and life-cycle support work worth $15.5 million.

This award modifies a $13.4 million contract originally announced in October 2002 for reactor-plant planning yard work. This work encompasses engineering services for life-cycle support, maintenance and modernization of the reactor plants and selected propulsion-plant systems on Los Angeles-, Ohio- and Seawolf-class submarines, and the nuclear research submarine NR-1. Additionally, Electric Boat will provide similar services for all systems on the Navy's moored training ships in Charleston, S.C.

If all options are exercised and funded, the contract would be worth $79.8 million over a five-year period ending in 2007.

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EB delivers lead Virginia-class submarine to U.S. Navy
(Oct. 13, 2004)

Electric Boat yesterday delivered the Virginia (SSN774), the first naval combatant ship designed specifically for post-Cold War missions, to the U.S. Navy.

The Virginia will join the Navy's fleet in a commissioning ceremony to be held Oct. 23 at the Norfolk Naval Base in its namesake state.

As the lead ship of the most capable class of nuclear attack submarines in the world, the Virginia has been designed from the ground up to operate as a key element of a joint naval force. Unobtrusive, non-provocative and connected with land, air, sea and space-based assets, Virginia-class ships are uniquely equipped to wage multi-dimensional warfare in the farthest reaches of the globe, providing the U.S. Navy with continued dominance in coastal waters or the open ocean. These submarines will transit submerged at high speeds, undetected, independent of sea state or logistic support and arrive on station ready for action.

"Virginia and the rest of the ships of its class are designed specifically to incorporate emerging technologies that will provide new capabilities to meet new threats," said Electric Boat President John Casey. "This enables Virginia to provide a unique and vital contribution to the nation's defense that will become increasingly important in a new and changing security environment."

Virginia-class missions will include conducting intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions, ensuring that U.S. commanders understand the scope and capability of an enemy's forces. Submarines of the class also will be able to engage enemy submarines, surface ships and critical targets ashore, both through precision strike and the covert insertion of special operations forces.

With their stealth and unlimited endurance, they will be flexible assets for Joint Force Commanders, able to maneuver with impunity, even in the most contested forward areas. Approved nearly four years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Virginia embodies warfighting and operational capabilities required to dominate the littorals while maintaining undersea dominance in the open ocean.

Electric Boat and Northrop Grumman Newport News are under contract to build the first 10 submarines of a planned 30-ship Virginia class under a teaming agreement that splits the construction workload between the two shipyards. A revolutionary approach to design and construction processes was employed for the Virginia class.

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EB hosts keel-laying for Hawaii (SSN776)
(Aug. 27, 2004)

Electric Boat hosted a keel-laying ceremony today for the Hawaii (SSN776), the third ship in the Navy's newest class of nuclear attack submarines.

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EB awarded $27M contract modification for submarine work
(Aug. 26, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $26.9 million contract modification for nuclear submarine work.

Under the terms of the contract modification, Electric Boat will provide design agent, planning yard, engineering and technical support for U.S. nuclear submarines, as well as the U.K. Trident submarine program. Electric Boat will also provide material to support the installation of design changes for submarine hulls; mechanical and electrical systems; command and control systems; and subsystems. Initially awarded March 3, the contract could be worth more than $1.1 billion over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Sixty-five percent of the work will be performed at Groton; 25 percent at Quonset Point, R.I.; 6 percent at Newport, R.I.; 3 percent at Kings Bay, Ga.; and 1 percent at Bangor, Wash. Work performed under this modification is expected to be completed by August 2007.

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Navy awards EB $16.4M for submarine maintenance work
(Aug. 17, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $16.4 million contract to perform routine maintenance work on the USS Dallas (SSN700), a Los Angeles-class attack submarine.

Under the terms of the contract, Electric Boat will perform a Drydock Selected Restricted Availability, which consists of repairs, maintenance work and alterations. The work will take place at the Naval Submarine Base in Groton from February to April 2005.

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Submarine Virginia (SSN774) completes first voyage
(July 30, 2004)

Virginia (SSN774), the nation’s newest and most advanced nuclear-powered attack submarine, returned to the Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Conn., today following the successful completion of its first voyage in open seas, called “alpha sea trials.” Virginia is the lead ship of the most capable class of attack submarines ever built; it will be delivered to the U.S. Navy this fall.

Virginia’s alpha sea trials included a range of submarine and propulsion plant operations, submerging for the first time, and high-speed runs on the surface and submerged, to demonstrate that the ship’s propulsion plant is fully mission-capable.

Virginia-class submarines have been designed from the ground up to operate as a key element of a fully networked naval force. Unobtrusive, non-provocative and connected with land, air, sea and space-based assets, Virginia-class ships are uniquely equipped to wage multi-dimensional warfare in the farthest reaches of the globe, providing the U.S. Navy with continued dominance in coastal waters or the open ocean. These submarines will transit submerged at high speeds, undetected, independent of sea state or logistic support and arrive on station ready for action.

“Nuclear submarines provide a unique contribution to our nation’s security and will be increasingly important in the decades ahead,” said Electric Boat President John Casey. “The Virginia and the rest of the ships of its class are designed specifically to incorporate emergent technologies that will provide new capabilities to meet new threats.”

Virginia-class missions will include conducting intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions, ensuring that U.S. commanders understand the scope and capability of an enemy’s forces. Submarines of the class also will be able to engage enemy submarines, surface ships and critical targets ashore, both through precision strike and the covert insertion of special operations forces. With their stealth and unlimited endurance, they will be flexible assets for Joint Force Commanders, able to maneuver with impunity, even in the most contested forward areas.

Virginia is the Navy’s only major fleet-ready combatant ship that was designed with the post-Cold War security environment in mind. Approved nearly four years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Virginia embodies warfighting and operational capabilities required to dominate the littorals while maintaining undersea dominance in the open ocean.

Electric Boat and Northrop Grumman Newport News are under contract to build the first 10 submarines of a planned 30-ship Virginia class under a teaming agreement that splits the construction workload between the two shipyards. A revolutionary approach to design and construction processes was employed for the Virginia class.

Participating in the sea trials were U.S. Navy Adm. Frank L. “Skip” Bowman, director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion; Rear Adm. Jeffrey Cassias, commander, Submarine Group Two; and Rear Adm. John Butler, program executive officer for submarines. Also participating in the sea trials were Capt. Jeffrey Reed, the Navy’s supervisor of shipbuilding in Groton; Michael Toner, executive vice president of General Dynamics Marine Systems group; John Casey, president of Electric Boat; and Becky Stewart, Northrop Grumman Newport News’ vice president – submarine program. Virginia is commanded by Capt. David Kern of Ledyard, Conn.

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EB christens submarine Jimmy Carter (SSN23)
(June 5, 2004)

The Jimmy Carter (SSN23), third and final Seawolf-class submarine, was christened at General Dynamics Electric Boat's Groton, Conn., shipyard today.

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EB awarded $12.8M contract modification for submarine work
(June 2, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $12.8 million contract modification for nuclear submarine work.

Under the terms of the contract modification, Electric Boat will provide design agent, planning yard, engineering and technical support for nuclear submarines. Electric Boat will also provide planning, scheduling and technical support for submarine maintenance activities. Initially awarded March 3, the contract could be worth more than $1.1 billion over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Eighty-five percent of the work will be performed at Groton, Conn.; 8 percent at Kings Bay, Ga.; 6 percent at Bangor, Wash.; and 1 percent at Quonset Point, R.I. Work performed under this modification is expected to be completed by September 2006.

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Jimmy Carter, third and final Seawolf submarine, to be christened June 5
(June 1, 2004)

Electric Boat will christen the Jimmy Carter (SSN23), the U.S. Navy's newest and most advanced nuclear attack submarine, at a ceremony at its Groton, Conn., shipyard Saturday, June 5, at 11 a.m.

Ship sponsor is Rosalynn Carter, the wife of former President Jimmy Carter, who will also participate in the ceremony. The event's principal speaker is James R. Schlesinger, who served under President Carter as the nation's first secretary of energy. Capt. (select) Robert D. Kelso, a 1983 graduate of Virginia Tech, is the ship's prospective commanding officer.

The Jimmy Carter honors the 39th president of the United States - the only submarine-qualified man who went on to become the nation's chief executive. As the last and most advanced of the three-ship Seawolf class, the Jimmy Carter will have built-in flexibility that gives it the power to prevail in any scenario and against any threat - from beneath Arctic ice to shallow water.

Differentiating the Jimmy Carter from all other undersea vessels is its Multi-Mission Platform (MMP), which includes a 100-foot hull extension that enhances payload capability, enabling it to accommodate advanced technology required to develop and test an entirely new generation of weapons, sensors and undersea vehicles.

Additionally, a dedicated and reconfigurable electronics suite using commercial off-the-shelf technology and open architecture will make it easy to accommodate future payloads and sensors.

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Electric Boat, MTC agree to safety incentive
(May 28, 2004)

Under the terms of an agreement reached between Electric Boat and the Metal Trades Council, bargaining-unit employees will receive cash payments of at least $150 if certain shipyard safety goals are achieved for the year.

The goal for the year is to attain an Operations and Quality & Material lost-workday injury rate (LWIR) of 3.0. If this goal is reached, each eligible employee will receive $150, less taxes. For each half-point below the goal, employees will receive an additional $50. For example, if the year-end LWIR is 2.5, the total award for each individual will be $200. If the LWIR is 2.0, the award will be $250, and so on.

To be eligible for the award, bargaining-unit employees must work a minimum of 500 hours (excluding absences) during the 2004 calendar year and must be on the payroll as of Dec. 1, 2004. Bargaining-unit employees who retire before Dec. 1 with at least eight hours worked during the year will also be eligible to receive the award.

The payments will be made on or before Jan. 14, 2005.

"Safety is and will continue to be the No. 1 priority at Electric Boat, and this incentive agreement reflects that," said Bob Nardone, VP - HR & Administration. "We are one of the safest shipyards in the nation, and it's due to the joint efforts of our management and union membership to make it so."

The safety incentive program was first offered in 1997 and has been repeated each year since, except for 1999. In each year of the program, the goal has been met and the award paid.

"Our members have done a remarkable job of reducing the number and severity of shipyard injuries over the past few years," said MTC President Ken DelaCruz. "With this agreement, they'll have an added incentive to continue the trend - and I know they'll succeed."

Operations Director Mike Alu applauded employees' recent safety performance, saying he expects even better results in '04.

"It's taken a conscious effort on everyone's part to produce safety numbers like the ones we've seen since this program began," he said. "I have the utmost confidence in the trades folks that we'll meet this challenge yet again."

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EB prepares submarine Jimmy Carter for June 5 christening
(May 10, 2004)

The third and final Seawolf-class attack submarine, Jimmy Carter (SSN23), was moved outdoors for the first time over the weekend at the Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Conn.

With a length of 453 feet, a beam of 40 feet and a displacement of 12,139 tons (submerged), the Jimmy Carter honors the 39th president of the United States - the only submarine-qualified man who went on to become the nation's chief executive. As the last and most advanced of the Seawolf class, the Jimmy Carter will have built-in flexibility that gives it the power to prevail in any scenario and against any threat - from beneath Arctic ice to shallow water.

Differentiating the Jimmy Carter from all other undersea vessels is its Multi-Mission Platform (MMP), which includes a 100-foot hull extension that enhances payload capability. This enables it to accommodate advanced technology required to develop and test an entirely new generation of weapons, sensors and undersea vehicles for naval special warfare, tactical surveillance and mine-warfare operations.

Additionally, a dedicated and reconfigurable electronics suite using commercial off-the-shelf technology and open architecture will make it easy to accommodate future payloads and sensors.

The Jimmy Carter will be christened at a shipyard ceremony Saturday, June 5, at 11 a.m. Ship sponsor is Rosalynn Carter, wife of former President Carter, who also will participate in the ceremony.

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EB awarded $299M for submarine work and materials
(May 6, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat $299 million for nuclear submarine work and materials.

Under the terms of a $293 million contract modification, Electric Boat will provide design, engineering, material and logistics support for strategic and attack submarines, and research and development for submarine research vehicles. Electric Boat will also provide planning, scheduling and technical support for submarine maintenance activities. Initially awarded March 3, the contract could be worth more than $1.1 billion over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Eighty-four percent of the work will be performed at Groton, Conn.; 3 percent at Bangor, Wash.; 4 percent at Kings Bay, Ga.; 3 percent at Newport, R.I.; and 5 percent at Quonset Point, R.I. Work performed under this contract is expected to be completed by September 2008.

In addition, the U.S. Navy awarded Electric Boat a $5.9 million material order for the purchase of long-lead-time materials required to support alterations on USS Michigan (SSBN727) and USS Florida (SSBN728). These Trident ballistic-missile submarines are being converted to Trident SSGNs, multi-mission submarines optimized for tactical strike and special-operations support.

Electric Boat is currently converting the first four Trident submarines to SSGNs: the USS Ohio (SSBN726) and the USS Michigan (SSBN727) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington; and the USS Florida (SSBN728) and USS Georgia (SSBN729) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Virginia.

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EB distributes layoff notices to 134 employees
(May 3, 2004)

Electric Boat is distributing layoff notices to 134 employees today as the design phases of several submarine programs near completion.

Of the affected employees, 127 are members of the Marine Draftsmen's Association; seven are salaried employees. All are employed at Groton, Conn.

"We've agonized over the reduction in our design and engineering business over the last several months," said EB President John Casey. "Unfortunately, we don't have enough design work to support the current size of the Innovation organization. This is a painful process for everyone involved, but we must align the size of our Innovation workforce with the level of our workload."

Casey noted that 21 of the laid-off employees can return to jobs in the shipyard. "Additionally, to minimize the number of potential layoffs, we will attempt to match affected employees with openings in other areas where they might be qualified," he said.

Affected employees will work through a 60-day notification period before their jobs end. During this period, they will have access to CT Works Centers in New London and Norwich, which provide placement assistance and an array of services to strengthen job-search skills. In addition, EB peer counselors located in Bldg. 189 are available to provide further assistance.

Laid-off employees will be provided with 40 paid hours to use the centers during their notification period. They can continue to use the centers after their jobs have ended.

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Navy awards EB $7.7M contract for submarine maintenance
(April 13, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $7.7 million modification to an existing contract for submarine maintenance and repair work. The initial contract, awarded in October 2001, will be worth $152.9 million over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Under the terms of the contract modification, Electric Boat will continue to provide non-nuclear submarine repair and maintenance services at the Naval Submarine Support Facility, located at the Naval Submarine Base in Groton.

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Carroll, Smith named to Finance posts
(April 6, 2004)

Two veteran members of EB's management team have received new assignments in Finance.

Kevin J. Carroll has been appointed director of program finance, succeeding Robert E. Smith, who was named director of contracts and estimating following the March 26 retirement of Dale Banks. Both Carroll and Smith will report to Chief Financial Officer John V. Leonard Jr.

Carroll joined Electric Boat in 1981 as part of the Construction Management Career Development Program. Over the next 23 years, he held several management positions, including chief of program finance, manager of cost engineering, manager of Seawolf and advanced concepts programs, and, most recently, manager of material program finance. He earned a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from Lehigh University and a master's degree in industrial engineering from the University of New Haven.

Smith joined Electric Boat in 1989, first working in the cost engineering department. In the 15 years since, he has held several management positions, including manager of Virginia-class program finance, and, most recently, director of program finance. He earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Clemson University and a master's degree in business administration from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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Navy awards EB $64M contract mod for Virginia-class work
(April 5, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $64 million contract modification for Virginia-class submarine lead-yard services.

The award modifies a $75 million contract initially announced in September 2000. If all options are exercised and funded, the five-year contract will be worth about $500 million.

Under the terms of the modification, Electric Boat will maintain, update and support the Virginia-class design and related drawings and data for each submarine, including technology insertion, throughout its construction and post-delivery maintenance period. Electric Boat will also provide all engineering and related services for maintenance and support of Virginia-class ship specifications. The work will be performed in Groton, Conn. (98 percent), Newport, R.I. (1 percent), and Quonset Point, R.I. (1 percent), and is expected to be completed by April 2005.

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Key management team members begin job reassignments
(April 2, 2004)

In a gradual transition, five key members of EB management will take on new jobs and responsibilities to strengthen their leadership capabilities for the future.

According to Bob Nardone, VP - HR and Administration, the job reassignments are an important element of the company's leadership development program and are expected to benefit both the individual and the company. "By challenging these senior managers with new responsibilities, the company will develop a more flexible management team with broader capabilities," he said.

The specifics of the reassignments are:

· Will Lennon, Virginia program manager, will take over as director of offsite operations from Pete Cawley, who is retiring. Lennon, who will report to Rick Geschrei, VP - Nuclear, Overhaul and Repair, will formally begin his job following the delivery of Virginia (SSN774).

· Dave McCall, project director - Innovation for combat systems, will become Virginia program manager, reporting to Fred Harris, senior VP - Programs.

· Franz Edson, MMP design program manager, will replace McCall and report to Millard Firebaugh, VP - Innovation.

· Larry Runkle will move from Astute program manager to MMP design program manager, reporting to Harris.

· Kristen Fletcher, deputy program manager for SSGN design, will become Astute program manager, also reporting to Harris.

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Navy awards EB $111M for submarine modernization work
(March 26, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $111 million contract modification to perform a Depot Modernization Period (DMP) on the USS Springfield (SSN761).

Under the modification, Electric Boat will perform repairs, alterations, maintenance, testing and routine work onboard the submarine. The work will be performed in Groton, Conn. (95 percent), and Quonset Point, R.I. (5 percent), and is scheduled for completion in June 2005. Including planning and material procurement work that began last year, the DMP will be worth a total of $137.3 million.

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Wilson named project director for U.K.'s Astute-class program
(March 17, 2004)

BAE SYSTEMS, the U.K. firm engaged in the development of the Astute-class nuclear attack submarine program for the Royal Navy, has named Brian Wilson as project director - Astute. In this role, he will report to Murray Easton, BAE SYSTEM's managing director - submarines. Wilson will remain an employee of General Dynamics Electric Boat, on loan to BAE SYSTEMS for this assignment. He reports to Fred Harris, EB's senior vice president - programs, within the EB organization.

Last April, Wilson was named Electric Boat's site manager at BAE SYSTEM's Barrow-in-Furness shipyard, where he has been directing a group of about 10 EB engineers and designers who are providing on-site design assistance to the Astute program.

"Brian is a naval architect who brings to this role a breadth of experience in the design and build of submarines, both in the U.S. and U.K.," said Easton. "Brian has played a crucial role in supporting our engineering activities, for which I am personally very grateful. I am now confident that he and his team will drive the Astute program forward into the build and commissioning phase," said Easton.

In addition to the U.K.-based group, Electric Boat has a contingent of designers in Groton providing the resources required by BAE SYSTEMS to complete timely, high-quality drawings to support the production phase of the Astute program. Larry Runkle is Electric Boat's program manager for the Astute project.

"This is a valuable assignment for Brian and Electric Boat," said Harris. "It enables us to continue using our engineering and design workforce as effectively as possible, and strengthens our longstanding bond with both BAE SYSTEMS and the Royal Navy.

"Brian's assignment with an international submarine maker is not an everyday occurrence, but I'm confident it will benefit the Royal Navy, BAE SYSTEMS and Electric Boat," Harris said.

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EB awarded $31.6M contract for work on nuclear submarines
(March 3, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $31.6 million contract for nuclear submarine work.

Under the terms of the contract, Electric Boat will provide design, engineering, material and logistics support for strategic and attack submarines, and research and development for submarine research vehicles. Electric Boat will also provide planning, scheduling and technical support for submarine maintenance activities. The contract could be worth more than $1.1 billion over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Under the initial award, 78 percent of the work will be performed at Groton, Conn.; 3 percent at Bangor, Wash.; 4 percent at Kings Bay, Ga.; 7 percent at Newport, R.I.; and 8 percent at Quonset Point,
R.I. Work performed under this contract is expected to be completed by September 2008.

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Navy awards EB $149.4M contract mod for SSGN work
(March 3, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $145.6 million contract modification to convert the USS Florida (SSBN728) from a Trident ballistic-missile submarine to an SSGN, a multi-mission submarine optimized for tactical strike and special-operations support. The modification also will provide $3.8 million for planning activities required for the conversion of USS Georgia from SSBN729 to SSGN729.

This award modifies a five-year, $443 million contract announced in September 2002 for design and related support work to convert the first four Trident ballistic-missile submarines to an SSGN configuration. If all options are exercised and funded, the contract will be worth a total of $1.029 billion.

Under the terms of the modification, Electric Boat will continue the conversion of USS Florida at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., concurrent with the ship's Engineered Refueling Overhaul. Additionally, the modification funds installation planning for the October 2005 conversion of the USS Georgia, also at Norfolk Naval Shipyard. This work includes establishing onsite teams from Electric Boat to plan and coordinate conversion activities, develop and manage conversion work packages and provide material control for items stored at the conversion site.

Work will be performed in Norfolk, Va. (58 percent); Quonset Point, R.I. (30 percent); and Groton, Conn.(12 percent). Work is expected to be completed by September 2007.

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EB receives $19M contract mod for submarine services
(Feb. 25, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $19 million contract modification for work on operational and new-construction submarines.

Under the terms of the award, Electric Boat will provide engineering support services and material to support major alterations, which will include changes to the hulls, mechanical and electrical systems, command and control systems and subsystems. The contract being modified was initially awarded in May 1999 and could be worth more than $742 million if all options are exercised and funded.

The work will be performed in Groton, Conn. (54 percent); Kings Bay, Ga. (19 percent); Bangor, Wash. (19 percent); Newport, R.I. (4 percent); and Quonset Point, R.I. (4 percent). Work performed under this modification is expected to be complete by the end of September 2004.

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EB awarded $15.6M contract modification for SSGN work
(Feb. 6, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $15.6 million contract modification to manufacture and procure long-lead-time material required for the conversion of the USS Georgia (SSBN729) Trident ballistic-missile submarine to an SSGN, a multimission submarine optimized for tactical strike and special-operations support.

This award modifies a five-year, $443 million contract announced in September 2002 for design and related support work to convert the first four Trident ballistic-missile submarines to an SSGN configuration. If all options are exercised and funded, the contract will be worth a total of $847 million.

The long-lead-time manufacturing effort includes material acquisition, manufacturing, inspection, test and storage. The conversion is scheduled to take place at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., beginning in October 2005.

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Navy awards EB $6.2M contract option for submarine parts
(Jan. 30, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $6.2 million contract option to provide on-board repair parts for the Virginia-class submarine Hawaii (SSN776).

Work will be performed at Electric Boat in Groton, Conn. (55 percent), and Northrop Grumman Newport News in Newport News, Va. (45 percent). Northrop Grumman is Electric Boat's teammate in the Virginia-class submarine program.

The option was exercised under the $4.2 billion contract awarded to Electric Boat in September 1998 for the construction of the first four Virginia-class submarines.

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EB receives $8.4B multiyear contract for Va.-class submarines
(Jan. 29, 2004)

The U.S. Navy has entered into an $8.4 billion multiyear contract with Electric Boat for the procurement of five Virginia-class attack submarines from FY04 through FY08.

The contract also includes the construction of a sixth Virginia-class submarine, which was authorized in FY03. Because work on this ship is already under way, it is not part of the multiyear agreement. Altogether, Electric Boat and its teammate, Northrop Grumman Newport News, now have contracts to build 10 Virginia-class submarines.

The multiyear contract, which supercedes the six-ship block-buy contract announced Aug. 14, 2003, enables Electric Boat to purchase materials, parts and components for multiple ships at one time, achieving significant savings over the life of the contract. Under previous contracting approaches, the company could buy only what it needed to build one ship at a time.

“We’re grateful to the congressional delegations from Connecticut, Rhode Island and Virginia for their support,” said Electric Boat President John Casey. “Our goal remains attaining a build rate of two submarines per year, which will provide the additional production stability needed to achieve even more significant efficiencies and cost savings for the Department of Defense, the Navy and the U.S. taxpayer.”

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MTC members to receive $150 safety award
(Jan. 14, 2004)

Members of the Metal Trades Council will receive a $150 safety award on Friday, minus applicable withholdings, for attaining an Operations/MTC lost-workday injury rate (LWIR) of 3.2 in 2003, the goal which had been established for the year. The LWIR represents the number of injuries per 100 full-time workers that resulted in at least one day away from work.

The company and MTC agreed to the safety incentive in 2003 - the sixth year of the program - in an effort to recognize employees for taking steps to reduce the number and severity of their on-the-job injuries.

"It's clear that EB employees are focusing on safety in the workplace," said David Crowell, chief of safety. "Our ability to meet this goal is no doubt the result of greater participation on the part of the MTC membership."

Operations Director Mike Alu praised shipyard employees for their continued reduction in the LWIR in 2003. "I'd like to thank everybody working in Operations for all the hard work they've put in to make Electric Boat a safer place," he said. "To quote Ken DelaCruz, our goal is to have people go home in the same condition they came to work. And 2003 was one of the best years we've ever had in that regard."

DelaCruz, president of the MTC, offered his congratulations to the membership and the MTC Safety Committee for their year-end injury statistics. "Our members take safety seriously," he said. "And thanks to this incentive program, they are once again being rewarded for it."

To be eligible for the award, bargaining-unit employees must have worked a minimum of 500 hours (excluding absences) during 2003 and must have been on the payroll as of Dec. 1, 2003. Bargaining-unit employees who retired before Dec. 1, 2003, and worked at least eight hours during the year will also receive the award.

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