2002 - Press Release Archives

Navy awards EB $54.6M for SSGN material procurement
(Dec. 20, 2002)

Navy awards EB $38M for SSGN conversion work
(Dec. 13, 2002)

Employees, EB pledge a record $1.3 million to regional charities
(Dec. 13, 2002)

Employees again meet incentive goal, will receive $500 checks
(Dec. 12, 2002)

EB gets $8.1M to manage and support nuclear maintenance
(Nov. 21, 2002)

EB awarded $57M contract modification for submarine work
(Nov. 20, 2002)

USS Seawolf docks at EB for short-term availability
(Oct. 30, 2002)

Decker named director of material acquisition
(Oct. 29, 2002)

EB lands technical-support contract for Australian submarines
(Oct. 7, 2002)

Navy awards EB $443M contract for SSGN design
(Sept. 26, 2002)

Navy awards EB $48.2M for Virginia-class R&D
(Sept. 25, 2002)

Navy awards $2.8M submarine maintenance planning contract to EB
(Aug. 26, 2002)

Geschrei named VP for nuclear, overhaul and repair
(Aug. 16, 2002)

Tyler named to fleet-support job
(Aug. 7, 2002)

EB gets $61M contract to operate Shippingport drydock at Navy base
(July 30, 2002)

McCall named to Innovation post
(June 20, 2002)

EB awarded $6M contract option for Virginia-class repair parts
(May 20, 2002)

Navy awards EB $52.5 million for Virginia-class work
(April 8, 2002)

EB awarded $5.9M contract modification for work on SSN23
(April 2, 2002)

EB gets $14.4M contract modification for submarine work
(March 18, 2002)

EB awarded $7M contract modification for Navy nuclear work
(March 13, 2002)

MTC members to receive $150 safety award
(Jan. 16, 2002)

Electric Boat to repair Historic Ship Nautilus
(Jan. 15, 2002)

Rattley named to Innovation post
(Jan. 3, 2002)

Navy awards EB $54.6M for SSGN material procurement
(Dec. 20, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $54.6 million contract modification to procure long-lead-time material for the Trident SSGN, a multi-mission submarine optimized for covert strike and special operations support.

This award modifies a five-year, $443 million contract awarded in September for the detailed design and related support work to convert the first four Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarines (also known as Tridents) to an SSGN configuration. If all options are exercised and funded, the contract will be worth a total of $544 million.

The submarines to be converted, coincident with their mid-life refuelings, are USS Ohio (SSBN726), USS Michigan (SSBN727), USS Florida (SSBN728) and USS Georgia (SSBN729). Electric Boat designed and built all 18 ships of the Ohio class. Under the modification, Electric Boat will procure long-lead-time material for USS Michigan, USS Florida and USS Georgia. Similar procurement is already under way for USS Ohio, the first ship scheduled for conversion.

With the capacity to carry up to 154 Tomahawk missiles and 102 Special Operations Forces personnel, SSGNs are considered prime examples of military transformation initiatives. Additionally, SSGNs will serve as platforms to develop and test new weapons systems, sensors and operational concepts that could further transform naval warfare.

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Navy awards EB $38M for SSGN conversion work
(Dec. 13, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $38.3 million contract modification to procure and manufacture long-lead-time material for the Trident SSGN, a multi-mission submarine optimized for covert strike and special operations support.

This award modifies a five-year, $443 million contract awarded in September for the detailed design and related support work to convert the first four Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarines (also known as Tridents) to an SSGN configuration. If all options are exercised and funded, the contract will be worth a total of $544 million.

The submarines to be converted, coincident with their mid-life refuelings, are USS Ohio (SSBN726), USS Michigan (SSBN727), USS Florida (SSBN728) and USS Georgia (SSBN729). Electric Boat designed and built all 18 ships of the Ohio class.

With the capacity to carry up to 154 Tomahawk missiles and 102 Special Operations Forces personnel, SSGNs are considered prime examples of military transformation initiatives. Additionally, SSGNs will serve as platforms to develop and test new weapons systems, sensors and operational concepts that could further transform naval warfare.

The manufacturing work to be performed under the contract modification will be done in Groton, Conn. (18 percent), and Quonset Point, R.I. (82 percent).

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Employees, EB pledge a record $1.3 million to regional charities
(Dec. 13, 2002)

Electric Boat employees and the company have combined to pledge a record total of $1.3 million for regional health and human-services agencies.

The amount pledged during the Groton EB Employees Community Services Association's fall campaign represents an increase of $120,000 over what was collected in 2002. Quonset Point employees completed a successful campaign at their facility as well, donating a total of $172,000 to their Community Services fund.

Of the total raised in Groton, $1.1 million will be donated to the United Way of Southeastern Connecticut. This includes a $300,000 contribution from Electric Boat. The remainder of the $1.3 million will be allocated to other United Way and charitable organizations where EB employees live.

Overall, the United Way of Southeastern Connecticut reached its fall campaign goal of $9.2 million under the direction of campaign chairman Fred Harris, EB's VP - Programs.

The leaders of this year's Community Services drive - MTC President Ken DelaCruz, MDA-UAW President Mel Olsson and EB VP Bob Nardone - attributed the success of the effort to the campaign volunteers from the MTC, MDA-UAW and salaried ranks. This year's participation rate hit 82 percent. Additionally, EB membership in United Way's Spinnaker Club - givers of $1,000 or more - increased by 58 to 170 employees.

"This is an exceptional achievement," said EB President Mike Toner. "It's a real tribute to the men and women of this company, who join ranks year after year to help the people in our communities who need it most. I want to thank each one of you who helped make this year's campaign such an outstanding success."

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Employees again meet incentive goal, will receive $500 checks
(Dec. 12, 2002)

Electric Boat employees will receive $500 incentive checks (minus applicable withholdings) on Friday as a result of the company reaching its Earned Hours goal for 2002.

"The company turned in a stellar performance for the year, and it's a direct result of the efforts of every employee," said President Mike Toner. "The Earned Hours checks are our way of saying thanks for an outstanding job."

The Earned Hours program was implemented in 2000 as a way to give employees a personal and financial stake in the company's overall performance. Following a successful introduction, the program has been repeated in the two years since, with higher goals established - and reached - each year.

"The Earned Hours program is a real win-win, because it gives our members the opportunity to share in the company's good fortune," said MTC President Ken DelaCruz.

"Our members are pleased to have helped Electric Boat reach its Earned Hours goals for the third year in a row," said MDA-UAW President Mel Olsson. "The company's strong performance is truly a reflection of everyone's dedication to the job."

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EB gets $8.1M to manage and support nuclear maintenance
(Nov. 21, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat an $8.1 million contract modification to manage and support nuclear maintenance work for submarines homeported at Naval Submarine Base New London.

The contract being modified was initially awarded in March 2001 and could be worth up to $39.9 million over five years if all options are exercised and funded. Under the terms of this modification, Electric Boat will continue to operate the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department (NRMD) at the submarine base through Sept. 30, 2003. The company will provide project-management, planning, training and radiological-control services in support of nuclear submarine maintenance, modernization and repairs for operational submarines. A core group of 23 Electric Boat employees is assigned to the NRMD, with surge groups of up to 60 shipyard employees for short periods.

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EB awarded $57M contract modification for submarine work
(Nov. 20, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $56.9 million contract modification for nuclear submarine work.

The contract was initially awarded in May 1999 and could be worth more than $742 million over five years if all options are exercised and funded. Under the terms of the modification, Electric Boat will provide design, engineering, material and logistics support for the Trident program, the Trident UK program, the two operational Seawolf-class submarines, NR-1, and efforts supporting Los Angeles-class ships. Electric Boat will also provide planning, scheduling and technical support for submarine maintenance activities.

Fifty-three percent of the work will be performed at Groton; 25 percent at Bangor, Wash.; 18 percent at Kings Bay, Ga.; and 4 percent at Newport and Quonset Point, R.I. Work performed under the modification is expected to be completed by September 2003.

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USS Seawolf docks at EB for short-term availability
(Oct. 30, 2002)

USS Seawolf (SSN21) returns to Electric Boat today for a three-week repair period, the second time a Navy submarine has docked at the shipyard under the terms of a leasing agreement announced earlier this year. Under this agreement, the Navy is leasing docking space from EB.

Although the ship will be docked at EB, the repair job will actually be managed by the Naval Submarine Support Facility at the sub base, said John Casey, vice president of Operations. This arrangement is similar to the one that brought USS Memphis (SSN691) to Groton several months ago for a longer-term availability.

"This availability represents a considerable amount of unplanned work for the company," said Casey. "In fact, most of the people on the job will be EB employees." He estimated that as many as 100 employees will be assigned to USS Seawolf on a daily basis for the duration of the repair job

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Decker named director of material acquisition
(Oct. 29, 2002)

Blair Decker has been appointed director of material acquisition, succeeding Ron Kiely, who retired after 36 years of service. Decker will report to Bob Scheel, vice president of quality and material.

In his new job, Decker will be responsible for purchased material, supplier selection, inventory management, industrial sales, and the award of purchase orders to support ship construction schedules and budgets. Most recently, he was manager of materials management.

“Blair is a talented executive whose extensive experience and knowledge of EB’s material acquisition process will be a key part of our efforts to achieve our business goals,” said EB President Mike Toner.

Decker joined Electric Boat in 1979 as an associate buyer. He graduated from Fairfield University with a bachelor’s degree in economics.

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EB lands technical-support contract for Australian submarines
(Oct. 7, 2002)

Electric Boat has won a three-year, $20 million contract to provide technical- and business-support services to the Australian Submarine Corp., with up to four one-year options.

Under the terms of the agreement, EB will provide management and technical advice on the maintenance, supply and refit of Australia's Collins-class submarines. The work will focus on modernized life-cycle support, strategic business planning, work packaging and scheduling, business processes and systems, management practices and ongoing engineering support. The Australian Submarine Corp. is now transitioning from being a submarine producer - it delivered the last of six Collins-class submarines last year - to a company that is focused primarily on maintenance, repairs and upgrades.

The initial EB team is led by James Moody and comprises Steven Middel, William Hunt and Gregory Machinski. They will establish an office in Adelaide in the near future.

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Navy awards EB $443M contract for SSGN design
(Sept. 26, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a five-year, $443 million contract for the design of the Trident SSGN, a multi-mission submarine optimized for covert strike and special operations support.

Under the terms of the contract, Electric Boat will begin detail design and related support work to convert the first four Ohio-class ballistic-missile submarines (also known as Tridents) to an SSGN configuration. The submarines to be converted, coincident with their mid-life refuelings, are USS Ohio (SSBN726), USS Michigan (SSBN727), USS Florida (SSBN728) and USS Georgia (SSBN729). Electric Boat designed and built all 18 ships of the Ohio class.

Considered a prime example of military transformation initiatives, SSGNs will carry up to 154 Tomahawk missiles and 102 Special Operations Forces personnel. SSGNs also will serve as platforms to develop and test new weapons systems, sensors and operational concepts that could further transform naval warfare, including large unmanned undersea vehicles and off-board sensors.

In addition to the design work, Electric Boat will procure long-lead-time material and assemble manufacturing kits for delivery to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Washington, the conversion yard for USS Ohio, the lead SSGN. USS Ohio is expected to rejoin the operational fleet as an SSGN in 2007.

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Navy awards EB $48.2M for Virginia-class R&D
(Sept. 25, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $48.2 million modification to an existing contract for research and development work on the Virginia-class submarine program. The contract was initially awarded in September 2000, and could be worth $480 million over five years if all options are exercised and funded.

Under the terms of this modification, Electric Boat will perform development studies for Virginia-class design improvements, and will continue to evaluate new technologies for insertion into succeeding Virginia-class submarines.

The Virginia Class will provide the U.S. Navy with the capabilities it requires to maintain its undersea superiority well in the 21st century. Electric Boat and its construction teammate, Northrop Grumman Newport News, are currently building the first four ships of the class under a $4.2 billion contract. Electric Boat will deliver the lead ship, Virginia (SSN774), in 2004. Thirty submarines are planned for the class.

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Navy awards $2.8M submarine maintenance planning contract to EB
(Aug. 26, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $2.8 million contract to perform planning work for maintenance on the USS Toledo (SSN769).

Under the terms of the contract, Electric Boat will immediately begin advanced planning for a 60-day maintenance period known as a Selected Restricted Availability (SRA). The SRA is scheduled to start at the Naval Submarine Base New London in April 2003.

The maintenance component of the overall task, which has not yet been awarded, is expected to be worth $9.4 million.

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Geschrei named VP for nuclear, overhaul and repair
(Aug. 16, 2002)

Richard J. Geschrei has been promoted to vice president of nuclear, overhaul and repair, reporting to EB President Mike Toner.

In this new position, he will be responsible for ensuring that nuclear production work, nuclear engineering and nuclear testing meets naval nuclear program standards. He will also direct the management of all ship maintenance/repair operations at Groton, the Naval Submarine Base New London and ship availabilities at offsite locations.

Reporting to Geschrei are Stan Walczyk, manager of nuclear production; Deneen Thaxton, director of nuclear projects; John Girard, director of nuclear test; Peter Cawley, director of offsite operations; SRA and DMP project managers and the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department (NRMD) at the sub base.

A 27-year veteran of Electric Boat, Geschrei graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a BS degree in nuclear engineering, and from Northeastern University’s Executive Management Development Program. Since joining the company, he has held positions of increasing responsibility in Operations and Engineering. Most recently, he served as EB’s chief nuclear engineer, with responsibility for the operation of the nuclear test organization, all waterfront construction engineering support, the Kesselring, N.Y., site and the technical operations of the NRMD.

In announcing Geschrei’s promotion, Toner said, “Rick brings to this position a unique combination of technical skills and leadership capability, which both the company and the customer rely upon heavily.”

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Tyler named to fleet-support job
(Aug. 7, 2002)

Ken Tyler has been appointed director of planning yard and fleet support. He succeeds Stan Fraser, who has retired after 37 years of service, and will report to Dugan Shipway, VP of Full Submarine Support.

In his new assignment, Tyler will have responsibility for planning yard and fleet-support activities, and logistics-services supporting Los Angeles-, Ohio-, Seawolf-, Virginia- and SSGN-class submarines.

Tyler joined Electric Boat in 1966 as an associate engineer in the nuclear-construction support organization. Since then, he has held several positions of increasing responsibility, serving most recently as manager of life-cycle engineering.

Tyler graduated from Lowell Technological Institute with a BS in nuclear engineering, and earned an MBA from the University of Hartford.

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EB gets $61M contract to operate Shippingport drydock at Navy base
(July 30, 2002)

Electric Boat has been awarded a U.S. Navy contract worth up to $61.1 million to maintain and operate the Shippingport drydock at the Naval Submarine Base New London.

The contract covers an initial period of one year, with options for four additional years. Management, operation and preventative maintenance of the Shippingport will be provided on a cost-plus-fixed-fee basis and is worth up to $34.6 million over the next five years, with $2.2 million of the total funded in the current fiscal year. The drydocking services associated with this contract will be paid on a firm-fixed-price basis and will be worth up to $26.4 million during the life of the contract.

The Shippingport (ARDM-4), which is used to lift submarines out of the water for repairs, had previously been operated by Navy personnel, but will now be run by a civilian crew of about 40 Electric Boat employees.

Assuming control of the Shippingport will give EB yet another presence at the sub base. The company already oversees the Navy's Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department there, as well as providing more than 200 employees to help staff the Naval Submarine Support Facility.

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McCall named to Innovation post
(June 20, 2002)

David McCall has been appointed director of combat and weapons systems. He succeeds Hal Drurey, who retired May 31.

In his new assignment, McCall is responsible for all activity associated with non-propulsion electronic-systems (NPES) development; electronic-system hardware/software integration; software development; subcontractor management; electronic-system test; and platform integration for government-furnished NPES.

Additionally, McCall will oversee electronic-system testing for dockside submarines, at the Command and Control System Module Off-Hull Assembly and Test Site (COATS), and at off-site locations.

"Dave's extensive nuclear submarine background makes him exceptionally well-suited to take on the challenges of this position," said Millard Firebaugh, VP - Innovation and Chief Engineer. Over the course of his 26-year Navy career, McCall served as the first commanding officer of USS Seawolf (SSN21); Commander, Submarine Squadron One; and Deputy Director for Command Center Operations in Washington, D.C. He joined Electric Boat in 2001.

McCall earned a bachelor's degree in oceanography from the U.S. Naval Academy and a master's degree in national security strategy from the National Defense University.

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EB awarded $6M contract option for Virginia-class repair parts
(May 20, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $6 million contract option for advance procurement of on-board repair parts for the first four submarines of the Virginia class.

The work will be shared about equally between Electric Boat (55 percent) and Northrop Grumman Newport News (45 percent), Electric Boat's teammate in the Virginia-class construction, and will be completed by the end of 2007.

The option is part of a $4.2 billion contract the Navy awarded Electric Boat in 1998 for the construction of the first four ships of the class.

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Navy awards EB $52.5 million for Virginia-class work
(April 8, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $52.5 million modification to an existing contract for Virginia-class submarine lead-yard services.

Under the terms of the contract, Electric Boat will maintain, update and support the Virginia-class design and related drawings and data for each submarine, including technology insertion, throughout its construction and post-delivery maintenance period. Electric Boat will also provide all engineering and related services for maintenance and support of Virginia-class ship specifications. The work is expected to be completed by April 2003.

The original contract was awarded in September 2000.

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EB awarded $5.9M contract modification for work on SSN23
(April 2, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $5.9 million contract modification to provide design, engineering and technical support for modifications to the submarine Jimmy Carter (SSN23). Electric Boat is now altering the Jimmy Carter, the third and final Seawolf-class submarine, to accommodate advanced technology for naval special warfare, tactical surveillance and mine warfare operations.

The modifications will require changes to the basic Seawolf design in the areas of ballast control, mission-management spaces, and various services. A unique feature of the modifications is the creation of a flexible ocean interface, referred to as the "wasp waist," which will enable the Navy to deploy and recover various payloads without having to use torpedo tubes. The ship is scheduled for a 2004 delivery.

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EB gets $14.4M contract modification for submarine work
(March 18, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat a $14.4 million contract modification for nuclear submarine work. The award is a continuation of a contract awarded in May 1999 to provide design, engineering, material and logistics support for the Trident program, the Trident UK program, the two operational Seawolf-class submarines, NR-1, and efforts supporting Los Angeles-class ships.

Eighty-nine percent of the work will be performed at Groton; 6 percent at Kings Bay, Ga.; and 5 percent at Quonset Point, R.I. The contract work is expected to be completed by September 2002.

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EB awarded $7M contract modification for Navy nuclear work
(March 13, 2002)

The U.S. Navy has awarded a $7 million modification to a previously awarded contract under which Electric Boat will manage and support nuclear-maintenance work for submarines homeported at Submarine Base New London, Conn.

Under the terms of the contract modification, Electric Boat will continue to operate the Nuclear Regional Maintenance Department (NRMD) at the submarine base through Sept. 30, 2002. The company will provide project management, planning, training and radiological-control services to support maintenance, modernization and repairs in support of operational submarines. A core group of 20 Electric Boat employees is assigned to the NRMD, with surge groups of up to 60 shipyard employees for short periods.

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MTC members to receive $150 safety award
(Jan. 16, 2002)

Members of the Metal Trades Council will receive $150 checks on Friday, minus applicable withholdings, for attaining an Operations lost-workday injury rate (LWIR) of 4.4 percent in 2001.

The 2001 LWIR goal was established at 5.1 percent. MTC members will receive $100 for meeting the goal, plus an extra $50 because the year-end rate was more than a half-point below the goal.

The company and MTC agreed to the safety incentive this year in an effort to recognize Operations employees for reducing the number and severity of on-the-job injuries.

"Injury rates were increasing each year prior to 1996, but in 1996 they started coming down," said David Crowell, chief of safety. "If you look at the trend, it's pretty significant. It really shows a tremendous improvement in the safety performance of our employees."

Operations VP John Casey credits this accomplishment to special attention paid to safety by supervision and the MTC. "The combination of both groups focusing on safety is the key to success," he said. "The ability to work safely must continue to be our No. 1 priority."

MTC President Kenneth DelaCruz said the benefit of the incentive program is twofold. "It provides a financial reward to employees for maintaining a safer work environment, and, more importantly, it allows more people to go home in good health at the end of each day."

To be eligible for the award, bargaining-unit employees must have worked a minimum of 1,000 hours (excluding absences) during 2001 and must have been on the payroll as of Dec. 1. Bargaining-unit employees who retired before Dec. 1 and worked at least eight hours during the year will also receive the award.

Bob Nardone, VP - HR & Administration, said the safety incentive program, which is now in its fourth year, reinforces Electric Boat's commitment to making the shipyard a safer place to work. "It also allows our shipyard employees to personally share in the company's success," he said.

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Electric Boat to repair Historic Ship Nautilus
(Jan. 15, 2002)

Electric Boat has been awarded contracts totaling $4.7 million from the U.S. Navy to repair and preserve the Historic Ship Nautilus (SSN571), the world's first nuclear-powered ship and one of EB's most significant technological achievements in more than 100 years as a shipbuilder.

The boat, which now makes its home at the nearby Submarine Force Museum in Groton, will be towed Wednesday to Graving Dock 1, where it will undergo blasting and painting of all exterior surfaces and repairs to deteriorated sections of its exterior structure. The ship's wooden decking will also be replaced.

The project, known as a Preservation Availability, has been in the works since early 2001, when Electric Boat began working with the Navy to develop a detailed work package.

The Nautilus, launched from EB's South Yard Ways on Jan. 21, 1954,
shattered all previous submerged speed and distance records and served the nation with distinction before finally being decommissioned in 1980. Its last visit to Electric Boat was for a full overhaul from 1972 to 1975.

This new visit will be much shorter, with the Preservation Availability scheduled for completion by May. The boat will then be towed back to the museum, where it is expected to reopen in time for the region's summer tourist season.

Coincidentally, the submarine's return to Electric Boat comes just one day shy of the 47th anniversary of the historic day when the Nautilus first got "underway on nuclear power."

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Rattley named to Innovation post
(Jan. 3, 2002)

Herbert C. Rattley Jr. has been appointed director of electrical design and engineering, succeeding Ed Lonergan, who is retiring after a distinguished career spanning more than 42 years at Electric Boat.

Rattley has been an Electric Boat employee since 1973, holding positions of increasing responsibility. He most recently served as manager of Virginia-class forward electrical and interior communications systems. Previously, he was manager of the Seawolf nuclear project.

In his new assignment, Rattley will oversee the engineering and design of electrical systems and electrical components for submarines. He'll also provide oversight of advanced power electronics and systems analysis engineering.

Rattley earned a bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering from the University of New Haven in 1973, and went on to do graduate work there. He is presently enrolled in an executive master's in engineering management program at UNH.

Making the announcement of Rattley's appointment was Innovation Vice President Millard Firebaugh. "Herb is the right person to direct electrical design and engineering at Electric Boat as we move into an era in which the functionality of our submarines transitions to essentially all-electric," Firebaugh said.

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