2000 - Press Release Archives

EB employees meet incentive goal, will receive $500 checks
(Dec. 13, 2000)

Employees, EB pledge a record $1.1M to regional charities
(Dec. 6, 2000)

Salaried sick time is down 51% over six years
(Dec. 5, 2000)

Industry group recognizes EB's software development capabilities
(Nov. 27, 2000)

Navy awards EB submarine work worth $48 million
(Oct. 19, 2000)

Electric Boat wins $78 million contract for Virginia-class submarine work
(Sept. 29, 2000)

Electric Boat introduces associates degree program for design apprentices
(Aug. 29, 2000)

Chontos is named general counsel
(Aug. 11, 2000

EB, MTC agree to safety incentive
(Aug. 4, 2000)

EB plans to close Avenel facility by year end
(May 5, 2000)

Electric Boat is awarded work worth up to $55M
(Feb. 29, 2000)

First hull section of lead Virginia-class sub arrives at Electric Boat's Groton shipyard
(Feb. 10, 2000)

EB performs Seawolf work at sub base
(Feb. 9, 2000)

Michael W. Toner is named Electric Boat president
(Jan. 6, 2000)

EB employees meet incentive goal, will receive $500 checks
(Dec. 13, 2000)

Electric Boat employees on Dec. 15 will receive $500 incentive checks (minus applicable withholdings) as the company met its earned-hours goal for the year. Meeting this target was essential for EB to attain its financial goals for 2000.

"I'm pleased that we've found a process that allows the people in our organization to share in the company's success," said EB President Mike Toner. "The message is clear - when we work together, we all succeed - and we all benefit. Thanks for your efforts."

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Employees, EB pledge a record $1.1M to regional charities
(Dec. 6, 2000)

Electric Boat employees and the company have combined to pledge a record total of $1.1 million for regional health and human-services agencies.

The amount raised during the EB Employees Community Service fall campaign represents an increase of $100,000 over what was generated in 1999.

Of the total raised, $831,000 will be donated to the United Way of Southeastern Connecticut. This includes a $200,000 contribution from Electric Boat. The remainder of the $1.1 million will be allocated to other United Way and charitable organizations where EB employees live.

The leaders of this year's Community Services drive - MTC President Ken DelaCruz, MDA-UAW President Mel Olsson and EB VP Bob Nardone, credited the success of the effort to the campaign volunteers from the MTC, MDA-UAW and salaried ranks. This year's participation rate hit 85 percent, with 32 percent of donors increasing their contributions. In addition, EB membership in United Way's Spinnaker Club - givers of $1,000 or more - increased from 72 to 92 employees.

"At the kickoff of the campaign, when I set the $1 million goal, I knew it would be a stretch, but I knew our people would do it," said EB President Mike Toner. "Year after year, we've come together to help the people in our communities who need it most. We've done it again this year - and in a bigger way than ever before."

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Salaried sick time is down 51% over six years
(Dec. 5, 2000)

From 1994 to 2000, Electric Boat salaried employees have reduced their use of paid sick time from an average of 7.2 days per year to 3.5 days - a 51 percent drop.

"That's a significant accomplishment that reflects the dedication of our salaried employees as well as the value of our more flexible work hours," said Bob Nardone, VP - HR & Administration. "As a result, we can maintain our high level of salaried sick-time benefits for those employees who really need them, while reducing overhead costs."

Since the introduction six years ago of an incentive program to reduce salaried absenteeism, the use of sick time has dropped steadily every year, Nardone said. During the most recent period, he said, 41 percent of salaried employees used no sick time. Altogether, well over half of the salaried population - 61 percent - used less than 1 percent sick time.

In recognition of these accomplishments, the company will give away $150,000:

· All salaried employees with 0 percent sick time for the year ending Nov. 30 will receive a $25 credit at the Fairwater Store. These employees will also be eligible to win up to $1,000 in a cash raffle (seventy-five $1,000 winners and fifty $500 winners will be selected).

· Employees with more than 0 percent but 1 percent or less will be entered in the drawing for fifty $500 prizes.

· Employees with 0 percent sick time for the two-year or longer period ending Nov. 30 will participate in an additional drawing for 20 $2,500 prizes.

· In addition, all groups will be entered in a drawing for 25 parking spaces, good for one year (Groton employees only; current pass holders are not eligible).

The drawings will be held in the Technology Center cafeteria Tuesday, Dec. 19, at noon.

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Industry group recognizes EB's software development capabilities
(Nov. 27, 2000)

Electric Boat has become one of only 166 companies worldwide and the only shipbuilder to attain what the software-development industry calls a Capability Maturity Model - Level 3.

The Software Engineering Institute designation was assigned to EB on Friday following an intensive two-week assessment of the company's ability to develop computer software to stringent global industry standards. There are five levels of achievement.

The assessment - conducted by the Software Productivity Consortium (SPC) - examined four software development projects within the Innovation organization. The projects and their leaders were:

· Virginia Ship Control (Tony Bisceglio, John Conway).
· Virginia Ship Control Trainer (Patrick O'Neil, Heidi Gantick).
· Virginia Impressed Current Cathodic Protection System (Andrew Wiglusz, Pete Salmoiraghi). This is used to protect hulls from seawater corrosion.
· Vibration Engineering and Structural Analysis Software (John Waters).

The assessment team was headed by SPC and included EB team members Greg Angelini, Walter Gless, Deb Pare and Al Remondi.

"A lot of people within Innovation worked very hard to help the company achieve the Level 3 designation," said Angelini, manager of software engineering. "Because of their efforts, Electric Boat is now further differentiated from the competition, which is a significant advantage in the marketplace."

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Navy awards EB submarine work worth $48 million
(Oct. 19, 2000)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat submarine engineering and life-cycle support work worth $48 million.

This contract modification will provide for design, engineering, material and logistics support for the Trident program, the two operational Seawolf submarines, the nuclear-powered research submarine NR-1 and efforts supporting SSN688 ships. It also supports D-5 missile backfit work at Puget Sound, Wash., and missile-tube maintenance efforts at Kings Bay, Ga.

Fifty-seven percent of the work will be performed at Groton; 23 percent at Bangor; 16 percent at Kings Bay; and 4 percent at Newport and Quonset Point, R.I.

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Electric Boat wins $78 million contract for Virginia-class submarine work
(Sept. 29, 2000)

Naval Sea Systems Command has awarded General Dynamics Electric Boat a $77.8 million contract for Virginia-class submarine lead-yard services.

The contract provides funding for design-yard services in support of research and development efforts for the baseline Virginia (SSN774) design, and technology insertion and upgrades for follow-on ships of the class. The contract also provides for design-yard support for construction of the planned 30 Virginia-class ships.

These submarines will provide the U.S. Navy with the capabilities it requires to maintain the nation's undersea superiority well into the 21st century. Currently, Electric Boat and its construction teammate, Newport News Shipbuilding, are working on a $4.2 billion contract to build the first four ships of the class. Electric Boat will deliver the first ship, Virginia, in 2004.

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Electric Boat introduces associates degree program for design apprentices
(Aug. 29, 2000)

Electric Boat and the MDA-UAW have reached an agreement with Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) to offer design apprentices an associates degree program in Ship Systems Design Technology.

"This is a win/win/win situation for the company, the union and the employees who participate in the program," said Bob Nardone, VP - HR & Administration. "It results from our strong relationship with the MDA-UAW and will enable us to invest today in the leadership Electric Boat will require in the future."

The program is being offered to current EB design apprentices who have successfully completed the apprentice curriculum. MMA is reviewing this curriculum and will award academic credit for courses and work assignments. Additionally, MMA will conduct eight courses to fulfill the remaining academic requirements for an AS degree.

MMA will present the courses from its Castine, Maine, campus using its video teleconferencing (VTC) capabilities. EB program participants will attend these courses on company time, with EB picking up the costs for tuition, administrative fees, classrooms with VTC capabilities and internet access.

Eligible apprentices are now engaged in the admissions process. Once this process is complete, classes will begin, possibly as early as the second week of September.

"The opportunity for our apprentices to earn an associates degree further strengthens the capabilities of our design force," said MDA-UAW President Mel Olsson. "This couldn't have been accomplished without the close working relationship between the company, the union and MMA."

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Chontos is named general counsel
(Aug. 11, 2000)

Joseph E. Chontos has been appointed Electric Boat's vice president and general counsel. He reports to EB President Mike Toner.

In his new position, Chontos will be responsible for all of Electric Boat's legal matters. He will oversee environmental and real estate issues, government and vendor contracts, intellectual property, commercial transactions, export compliance, litigation and employment law as well as OSHA and workers' compensation law.

Chontos comes to Electric Boat from General Dynamics, which he joined in 1999 as associate general counsel responsible for strategic alliances and teaming agreements, compliance matters, government contracts matters and government cost accounting issues. From 1995 to 1999, he was a partner and associate at Jenner & Block in Washington, D.C.

Between 1990 and 1995, Chontos served as a captain in the U.S. Army, where he was assigned as assistant to the general counsel, Department of the Army, and later as counsel to the deputy assistant secretary of defense (cooperative threat reduction).

He graduated with high honors from the University of Virginia in 1987; he also was a distinguished military graduate of the U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training Corps and completed the U.S. Army Airborne School.

Chontos received his law degree from the University of Chicago in 1990.

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EB, MTC agree to safety incentive
(Aug. 4, 2000)

Shipyard employees will receive cash if safety goals are met.

Under the terms of an agreement reached between Electric Boat and the Metal Trades Council, bargaining-unit employees will receive cash payments of at least $100 if certain safety goals are achieved for the year.

The goal for the year is to attain an Operations lost workday injury rate (LWIR) of 5.9 percent. If this goal is reached, each eligible employee will receive $100. For each 0.5 percent reduction to the LWIR, each employee will receive an additional $50. For example, if the LWIR rate is 5.4 percent, the total award for each individual will be $150. If the LWIR is 4.9 percent, the award will be $200, and so on.

To be eligible for the award, bargaining-unit employees must work a minimum of 1,000 hours (excluding absences) during the 2000 calendar year and must be on the payroll as of Dec. 1, 2000. Bargaining unit employees laid off before Dec.1 who worked at least 1,000 hours during the year and employees who retired before Dec. 1 and worked at least eight hours during the year will also be eligible to receive the safety recognition award.

The payments will be made on or before Dec. 22.

"This is another step toward our goal of enabling employees to tangibly share in the success of the company," said Bob Nardone, VP - HR & Administration. "More important, however, is the goal of making the shipyard a safer place to work. This agreement reinforces our commitment."

"We want all our talented members to go home to their families in the same condition they came to work," said MTC President Ken DelaCruz. "If there's a savings to the company, it's a good thing that all our members be rewarded. I'm glad we were able to work it out."

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EB plans to close Avenel facility by year end
(May 5, 2000)

Action is prompted by declining workload

Electric Boat today announced that it plans to shut down its facility in Avenel, N.J., Electro Dynamic, by the end of the year because of a declining workload.

"For many years, our Avenel facility has maintained and advanced its reputation for excellence in the design and manufacture of quiet rotating machinery, motors and fans for the U.S. Navy," said EB President Mike Toner, who announced the shutdown at an all-hands meeting earlier today at Avenel. He was accompanied by Bob Nardone, VP - HR and Administration, and John Leonard, VP - Finance.

"Our employees at Avenel have done an outstanding job and contributed significantly to the success of General Dynamics and the Navy," said Toner. "Unfortunately, we don't believe there is enough work - current or projected - to keep the facility going."

Electric Boat currently employs 111 people in Avenel, about one third of whom are eligible to retire. A limited number of employees will be offered positions in Groton, where Avenel's work will be consolidated. The remainder of the work force will be offered career-transition assistance.

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Electric Boat is awarded work worth up to $55M
(Feb. 29, 2000)

The U.S. Navy has awarded Electric Boat submarine engineering and life-cycle support work worth up to $55 million.

The largest of the awards - $38.3 million - will provide for design, engineering, material and logistics support for the Trident program. The award also supports work at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard to backfit older Trident submarines to accommodate D-5 missiles, and missile-tube maintenance at Kings Bay, Ga.

Sixty percent of the work will be performed at Groton; 11 percent at the Newport engineering office and Quonset Point facility; 13 percent at Bangor, Wash.; and 5 percent at the Washington, D.C., engineering office

Under the terms of the other award, Electric Boat will perform $4.2 million worth of planning work in support of Selected Restricted Availabilities scheduled for USS Dallas (SSN700) and USS Pittsburgh (SSN720) in 2001. The option to perform the maintenance and upgrade work at the New London submarine base will be worth $12.4 million, bringing the total potential value for the SRAs to $16.6 million.

"These jobs represent a significant amount of work for Electric Boat employees," said EB President Mike Toner. "They also underscore our continuing commitment to retain and build upon our core strengths - in these two cases, in engineering and life-cycle support."

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First hull section of lead Virginia-class sub arrives at Electric Boat's Groton shipyard
(Feb. 10, 2000)

The first hull section of Virginia (SSN774), the first of the U.S. Navy's newest class of nuclear attack submarine, arrived at the Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Conn., on Saturday.

The 1,000-plus-ton hull section was transported by barge from Electric Boat's Quonset Point, R.I., facility, where it was fabricated and outfitted with equipment and components. "This is the most complete hull section Electric Boat has ever shipped," said Frederick J. Harris, VP - Programs. "It clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the design/build approach we have developed for the Virginia class."

Electric Boat and Newport News Shipbuilding have established a team to build Virginia-class submarines and are currently working under a $4.2 billion contract for the first four ships, with the two yards alternating delivery of the ships. Electric Boat is scheduled to deliver Virginia to the Navy in 2004.

Representing a revolution is cost-effective design and construction techniques and mission flexibility, the Virginia class will provide the Navy with the capabilities it requires to maintain the nation's undersea superiority well into the 21st century.

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EB performs Seawolf work at sub base
Feb. 9, 2000

Electric Boat is currently engaged in performing $8.1 million worth of work on USS Seawolf (SSN21) at the Navy submarine base in Groton. Known as a technical availability or TAV, the 63-day job involves a range of upgrades, repairs and alterations to various internal and external systems on the lead ship of the Seawolf class. According to John Casey, VP - Operations, the job represents part of the company's effort to obtain more submarine maintenance work, which is key to retaining essential shipyard skills and capabilities.

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Michael W. Toner is named Electric Boat president
Jan. 6, 2000

Michael W. Toner has been appointed president of Electric Boat. He succeeds John K. Welch, who will direct the operations of General Dynamics Marine Systems.

Raised in Highland Park, N.J., and a graduate of St. Peter's High School in New Brunswick, N.J., Toner, 56, was most recently senior vice president of Electric Boat, directing the activities of 4,200 employees engaged in the engineering and design of nuclear submarines for the U.S. Navy.

"Mike is truly a shipbuilder's shipbuilder," said Welch. "He brings to his new assignment a hands-on familiarity with every aspect of Electric Boat, as well as a deep appreciation of the company's people and their capabilities. Over the last several years, Mike has convincingly demonstrated his leadership abilities, playing key roles in our re-engineering efforts and the establishment of the company's strategic direction."

Toner joined Electric Boat in 1965 as a test engineer and progressed through a series of positions with increasing responsibility. In 1975, he was named manager of reactor services, overseeing all nuclear refueling and new construction fueling operations; two years later, he became manager of Trident ship's management, with responsibility for the coordination of Trident submarine construction.

In 1979, Toner was promoted to assistant general superintendent of the Pipe Shop, directing the installation of all non-nuclear piping systems. Between 1982 and 1990, he was director of facilities management, with responsibility for the maintenance, repair and construction of Electric Boat's physical plant and equipment.

Toner was appointed director of operations in 1990 and vice president - operations in 1992, overseeing all production, planning and support activities from construction start to ship's delivery. He was appointed vice president - delivery in 1994, with responsibility for all production, delivery and support activities at Electric Boat's facilities in Groton and Windsor, Conn., Quonset Point, R.I., Avenel, N.J., and West Milton, N.Y.

The son of the late Marion and William M. Toner of Mantoloking, N.J., Toner is a 1965 graduate of New York Maritime College with a B.S. degree in nuclear science. He earned an M.S. in engineering from the University of Connecticut in 1970, and an Executive MBA from the University of New Haven in 1982.

Toner is a member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and is chairman of the Executive Control Board of the National Shipbuilding Research Program. In addition, he serves as leadership giving chairman of the United Way of Southeastern Connecticut.

He and his wife, Carol, live in Mystic. They have three adult children.

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